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Friday, 1 August 2014

WAIRARAPA TIMES AGE 2 FEBRUARY 2014 - VAUGHAN TOCKER: PORTRAIT OF A RWR OFFICER

Vaughan Tocker is proud to be white. The 53-year-old Masterton grandfather was last weekend promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the Right Wing Resistance New Zealand, swearing an oath as Wairarapa regional commander "to give my life" in defence of the nationalist group, his family and homeland. At the Masterton property he shares with his new partner, he and fellow "foot soldiers" afterwards spent time with Kyle Chapman, founder of the organisation in New Zealand and head of the political Resistance Party, of which the RWR is the "street arm". Mr Chapman also is leader of the North Canterbury survivalist European Land Base and his RWR blog links to affiliate groups across the globe, from Australia to Britain, Europe and both American continents. Mr Tocker's new uniform has a black jacket fixed with insignia woven in white - a wolfsangel rune and single pip at the collar, the RWR warrior skull emblem and legend at the chest left and right, and badges decorating a cuff and the front of the jacket that read Resistance, Unit Leader, In Good Standing, Security and Frontline. Self-inked tattoos on both arms and hands also proclaim political and lifestyle choices, including an Iron Cross on the index finger of his left hand and the letters STAI beneath the knuckles of his right hand - an acronym for Stop The Asian Invasion. Black pants, heavy black boots, and a black cap embroidered with a white skull complete the outfit. He removes his dark glasses for his photograph and interview. "I was chosen. I was chosen to run this unit here in Masterton about two years ago because we've had so many other white factions start up and usually they get run out of town or get disbanded fairly quickly," he said. "RWR is a political organisation and they wanted someone with enough, what would you call it - guts, balls, audacity, whatever - to start a unit here, to make it succeed and to keep it going. "A lot of the white guys that are in town, when they get together, they tend to get trouble. "We get called baldheads, racialists. We get slapped with all sorts of names. "The European is a race of people too and the RWR is here to protect the future and heritage of white children, to make sure the European race survives." However, while the RWR is strictly for members of European "ethnic origins", the Resistance Party is bicultural and accepts Maori as members. Both organisations are headquartered in Christchurch, Mr Tocker said, with the RWR split into northern and lower North Island divisions, which comprise units in centres including Palmerston North, Napier, Whanganui, Tauranga and Huntly. "We have many members and we're basically soldiers for the Resistance Party, we put out the fires, our job is to hassle politicians and attack Government issues we oppose. "If trouble comes, we have Retaliators to defend us and our families - we look after our own." Included in his duties as a commanding and security officer, he said, are foot patrols by night of the Masterton central business district, flyer drops, organising training camps and monthly social events for members, political protest and recruitment drives. Mr Tocker, who admits to several convictions for violence "but none for dishonesty or involving women or children", had in the more recent past launched lone forays against Government policy, "when I called myself the Positive Opposition Party". He wrote a 37-page document in 2008 outlining his alarm over child abuse cases in his home region, he said, which was sent to Wairarapa MP John Hayes and the Independent Police Complaints Authority. The Wairarapa Times-Age that year broke the story of a police backlog of 108 cases of child abuse in the region. Similar situations were discovered in other centres and Operation Hope was formed to investigate the neglected cases. "I'm politically motivated and I saw a huge problem for New Zealand that was being ignored - it compelled me. I wanted children to know they can go in and complain and somebody will listen. "But a lot are in their 30s and 40s before they realise what damage has been done. We need to believe our children." Mr Tocker was born in Masterton, attending Rathkeale and Kuranui colleges. His first job out of school was working as a culler, poisoning and trapping pests and shooting goats, sometimes from a helicopter, in the Ruahines, Tararuas and Bay of Islands. He has bred bull terriers for two decades and today works as a scrapyard manager. His parents, Lyn and the late Ian Tocker, owned and operated the Highwayman Motel in Masterton, then ran the Royal Tavern in Featherston. His father went on to run the Eketahuna Hotel and the town's fish'n'chip shop. All three of his adult children are RWR "supporters" who also live in Masterton, he said, and he has five grandchildren in the town "with one on the way". Mr Tocker said he adopted a new understanding of his Wairarapa upbringing after considering the RWR stance on multiculturalism, immigration and "protecting our white heritage" in New Zealand. "In my family I'm the only white boy. They're basically Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Whenua but I'm not Maori at all. "My Auntie Molly [Mahupuku] brought me up at Papawai [near Greytown] and all my nephews, nieces, cousins, aunties, they're all Maori. "I was always the soccer ball at all the parties, so I gave up going to the hangis and the tangis - it's just not cricket. "I lost my identity, that's actually what happened to me. I lost my identity. "I felt I had to be a Maori to be a part of my family. But I decided I wasn't going to bow down like that." The end of his first marriage also played a role in drawing him to the RWR, he said. "My first wife took off with an Egyptian. She's still in Cairo and I fought for years to keep my children here in New Zealand, all three of them. "Government policy was to fill up New Zealand with foreigners, while the natives of our country, both Maori and European, have less and less of a voice". A White Pride World Wide Day will be held in Christchurch on March 22 to celebrate the RWR's five-year anniversary and as an officer he must attend. Last year he took part in a Flag Day march to Parliament against the proposed ditching of the New Zealand flag. "The RWR have got big plans for this year. I have my ups and downs but things are going well - my boss believes in me, my missus believes in me, my kids believe in me, people believe in me. "As whites, we have a voice, we will be heard and I will be a part of it." LINK: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa-times-age/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503414&objectid=11195688

2 comments:

  1. VAUGHAN TOCKER is now the Captain of the RWR Central Division (Masterton-based).

    ReplyDelete
  2. He's a very LOYAL Officer, doing well his job.

    ReplyDelete